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Collect data about the ocean

Collect data about the ocean

Rothera Research Station is the British Antarctic Survey’s centre for marine science. Experienced divers explore all year round. In the winter months, the sea freezes so divers have to cut a hole in the ice before they can dive down below the frozen surface.

Collect data about the land

Collect data about the land

Rothera Research Station is the central hub of the British Antarctic Survey field science programme. Each season, up to 30 field teams are flown out to locations all over the Antarctic Peninsula to gather data from specific remote sites.

Collect data about the air

Collect data about the air

Atmospheric studies have been going on at Rothera for over 30 years, providing vital information about the changes going on in the atmosphere above the Antarctic Peninsula. Weather balloons are launched every day, giving scientists an unbroken record of long and short-term trends.

The scope of IPY science

The scope of IPY science

International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-2008 was the largest internationally co-ordinated research programme for 50 years. It was an intensive period of interdisciplinary science focused on the Arctic and Antarctic.

IPY in a nutshell

IPY in a nutshell

International Polar Year (IPY) 2007–2008 was the largest co-ordinated international scientific effort for 50 years. From ice sheets and space science to Arctic communities and the creatures of the Southern Ocean, IPY included more than 200 Arctic and Antarctic projects and harnessed the skills of 50,000 people – including scientists, students and support staff – from 63 nations.

Antarctica – let it be!

Antarctica - let it be!

At the moment, the Antarctic Treaty determines what people can or cannot do on the continent, but there is always a risk that governments will abandon the treaty. Discussions on opening up Antarctica for mining resources like coal and oil, or using it for a dumping ground for waste should never happen. The ban on these activities must be permanent. Antarctica is too precious – it should have guaranteed protection for another thousand years, not fifty.