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Hut Point

Robert Falcon Scott’s Hut, Hut Point

Hut Point was Robert Falcon Scott’s first expedition base in Antarctica, established for the National Antarctic (Discovery) Expedition 1901-1904. The expedition included a major programme of science and was a landmark in British Antarctic exploration resulting in Scott returning to Britain as a national hero. His base became an important staging post for every subsequent ‘heroic-era’ expedition. Today Captain Scott’s first base at Hut Point remains a testament to scientific endeavour.

Cape Royds

Ernest Shackleton’s Hut, Cape Royds

This is the base associated with Sir Ernest Shackleton’s British Antarctic (Nimrod) Expedition 1907–1909. The expedition is notable for a number of firsts. In March 1908 a party of five was the first to climb the world’s southernmost volcano (Mt Erebus). In January 1909, fifty year old Professor Edgeworth David led a party of three to be the first to reach the Magnetic South Pole (an epic 1600km sledging trip). In late 1908 Shackleton led a party of four in an attempt to be the first to reach the Geographic South Pole. After man-hauling for two and a half months, and less than 97 nautical miles from the Pole, Shackleton made a decision, considered to be the finest in early polar history, to turn for home. The expedition also discovered over 800km of new mountain range and pioneered the way to the Antarctic Plateau.

Cape Evans

Robert Falcon Scott’s Hut, Cape Evans

The iconic base associated with Captain Robert Falcon Scott’s British Antarctic (Terra Nova) Expedition 1910–1913 and his second, and final, heroic attempt for the Geographic South Pole. The expedition gave rise to some of the most inspirational and harrowing stories associated with polar history. Michael Palin has described it as “one of the great memorials to exploration anywhere on Earth”.

Cape Adare

Carsten Borchgrevink's Hut, Cape Adare

This is the base associated with Carsten Borchgrevink’s British Antarctic (Southern Cross) Expedition 1898 – 1900 and later, Scott’s Northern Party expedition (1911). The site is notable not only for its role in the discovery of Antarctica but also as the only example left of humanity’s first building on any continent.

Wordie House

An early British scientific research station

Wordie (HSM 62) (65°15’S, 64°16’W) ‘Base F (Wordie House)’ on Winter Island, Argentine Islands. Of historical importance as an example of an early British scientific research station. It was established in January 1947 as (Base F) ‘Argentine Islands’ and the main hut, ‘Wordie House’, was named after the chief scientist on Ernest Shackleton’s epic 1914–17 expedition.

Stonington Island

Hut on Stonington Island, Marguerite Bay, western Graham Land

Stonington(HSM 64) (68°11’S, 67°00’W) ‘Base E’ on Stonington Island, Marguerite Bay, western Graham Land. The base was established in February 1946 and had two periods of operation from 1946–50 and 1960–75 when the base permanently closed. The famous polar explorer Sir Vivian Fuchs was the Base Commander in 1948 and 1949.

Port Lockroy

Port Lockroy is not only an important natural and historic environment, but also a destination for many from around the world who want to come and learn more about the Antarctic.

Port Lockroy is on Goudier Island (64º49’S, 63º30’W) in the Antarctic Peninsula. Following a conservation survey in 1994, British ‘Base A’ – Port Lockroy was recognised for its historical importance and designated as Historic Site and Monument No. 61 under the Antarctic Treaty.

Horseshoe Bay

Hut on Horseshoe (HSM 63)(67°48'S, 67°18'W) ‘Base Y’ on Horseshoe Island, Marguerite Bay, western Graham Land. It was established in March 1955 and closed in August 1960. The scientific research carried out at the station included topographic survey, geology and meteorology.

Horseshoe (HSM 63)(67°48’S, 67°18’W) ‘Base Y’ on Horseshoe Island, Marguerite Bay, western Graham Land. It was established in March 1955 and closed in August 1960. The scientific research carried out at the station included topographic survey, geology and meteorology.

Detaille Hut

Detaille Hut on Detaille Island

Detaille (HSM 83)(66°52’S, 66°38’W) Base “W” was established in 1956 as a British science base primarily for survey, geology and meteorology and to contribute to the IGY in 1957.